Sigurd’s Lament

The first copies of Sigurd’s Lament: An Alliterative Epic: In literature, the advice often given is to show and not tell. In academia, it is the opposite: tell and do not show. Sigurd’s Lament is a text that asks the question, can scholarship show rather than tell? On the surface, it is the collected work of a […]

The Aesthetics of Writing Religion

Comparing the experience and traditions of religion to Kant’s understanding of the sublime as a “representation of limitlessness” that provokes a sense of rational and imaginative “unboundedness,” Daniel Gold argues convincingly that the most provocative “religiohistorical writing” is situated somewhere between the poles of absolute, explanatory understanding and completely individual creativity. Any analysis of religious […]

Religion in Objects

S. Brent Plate seeks to shift our focus away from the role of the senses in religious experience and towards the role of the object. Religion, for Plate, is rooted in interactions not only with posited superhuman agents but also in the body and its sensual relations to physical objects. It is not the religious […]

Encountering Religion

Religion is what is always slipping away. It is about, Tyler Roberts writes, “the fact that as we pursue and try to articulate and grasp the things most important to us—whether ‘meaning,’ ‘value,’ ‘identity,’ ‘love,’ ‘God’—they  elude  us” (12). In fact, meaning and value take place in this elusiveness, in this slippage. Religion cannot be […]