Miscellany

The Rise and Fall of Illyria, from the Annals of Quintus Fabius Pictor

It is common knowledge that towards the end of King Labeates’ reign, he retired to the Adriatic to rule from warmer climates.  His health was slowly declining, and his advisors, apothecaries, and magicians assured him that warmer climates would do wonders for his health.  This left, however, an insatiable gulf in the Illyrians’ capital city, Skodra.  What of ceremony?  What of Empire?  Without an ever-present emperor, how shalt the Illyrians recall their truer nature?  It took little time for Agron, the wealthy senator, son of Gentius the Younger, to gather his supporters and maneuver for the throne.  He needed both the backing of Labeates’ General Bardyllis and the fortuitous death of King Labeates.  The first he acquired through gold and promises; the later through the help of the royal apothecary, Silvanus.  Once done, he called for a vote of no confidence in the young prince, Plueratus, which successfully passed.  Agron was installed as the ruling prefect until the princling came of age.  The following spring, however, young Plueratus fell to his death while hunting in the western regions of Illyria.  Agron’s reign was inaugurated soon thereafter.  His dynasty was to stretch from the northern most tip of Pannonia to the southern reaches of Bylliones.  Achieving much in his time, he is best known for solidifying the fractured city-states of Illyria under Labeates’ rule and ushering in a golden age of education and culture.  During his time, the Illyrian’s, uncharacteristically, were a literate and flourishing people. —QFP, Chapter XVI, The Triumph of Agron             

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